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Upcoming Events.

"Eurydice" Theatre Production

February 23-27 (7:30pm)

Hedrick Little Theatre

Category: Theatre Productions


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by Sarah Ruhl; Directed by Beth Homan

MacArthur "Genius" award recipient and two-time Pulitzer Prize-nominated playwright, Sarah Ruhl reimagines the classic myth of Orpheus through the eyes of its heroine, Eurydice.

 Dying too young on her wedding day, Eurydice must journey to the underworld, where she reunites with her father and struggles to remember her lost love. With contemporary characters, ingenious plot twists, and a few impossibilities, the play is a fresh look at a timeless love story.

Like most of Ruhl's remarkably poetic plays, Eurydice is a love letter to what makes the theatre theatrical. Her plays celebrate what she calls "the pleasure of heightened things," and are full of both figurative and literal transformations—"revelations in the moment" that are reflected in her characters, their stories, and often the stage space itself. 

Opening Night Reception:
If you attend Catawba's MainStage opening night production of Eurydice on February 23, you are formally invited to attend a reception following the performance where there will be a toast given and an opportunity to meet with the cast and crew of the production.

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exp-form.jpgAbout this Season: Experiments in FORM This season, the Catawba Theatre Arts program presents six performances with the thematic goal of looking at the conversation that happens in the creative act between the form of a work of art and its content (its story, message, or meaning). Each of the pieces presented this season represents a shift in perspective on theatrical form — a “new shape” for their time—crafted by the playwrights and choreographers to more effectively contain the political, philosophical, and aesthetic essence of each work’s historical and cultural moment. The directors this season (four faculty, two students and one guest) will examine questions like: How does the structure of a piece connect to its story? How is the form of a piece reflective of the culture that invented it? How do we, as artists, interrogate a historical form to make its content relevant to contemporary audiences? How does content determine form and how does form determine content?