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Catawba’s Segue 61 in Nashville Going Strong

March 27, 2017

Category: Academics, Music, Students


Inaugural Class Thriving Thanks to Creative Sessions with Music Industry Mentors 

logo-segue61.pngSegue 61, a first-of-its-kind, post-baccalaureate certificate program offered by Catawba College in Nashville, was officially launched in January.  Now two months later, the initial group of elite students is learning from experienced mentors about how to bridge their transition from formal education to full-fledged careers in the music industry.

These student include promising musicians, songwriters, producers/engineers and music business hopefuls from all genres with one key thing in common: they all want to pursue careers in the music industry.  Their eight-month experience has and will continue to bring them in daily contact with influential mentors like session guitarist Guthrie Trapp, drummer Pete Abbott, and former BMI and Sony executive Clay Bradley whose grandfather Owen Bradley helped create the Nashville sound, plus working executives & creatives active now in the thriving music marketplace.

To get an idea about how the daily routine goes for these inaugural Segue 61 students, Natalie Thompson, Coordinator of Operations & Student Engagement for the program, provided these two blog installments.  In the first, titled “The Road to Success,” she describes a day under the tutelage of the current tour manager for Weezer, Thomas O’Keefe.  In the second, titled “Professionals, Not Professors,” she details sage advice Segue 61 students received from Derek Simon, the president of Blaster Records.

If these blogs stoke an interest in the Segue 61 program, application materials are being accepted for the second group of students who will begin their real-world studies in early May. For details, visit www.segue61.com or for more information on this program, contact Segue 61 Executive Director Bill Armour at 336-918-0593 or barmour@segue61.com.

Read the blogs below:

The Road to Success

Professionals, Not Professors