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COMPUTER SCIENCE.

B.S. Degree in Computer Science

Computer Science Degree – Bachelor of Science (BS)

An interdisciplinary major at Catawba College offered between the Mathematics and Computer Science Department and the Ketner School of Business.

Mathematically strong students who wish to make connections between theoretical mathematics and applications in computer science are encouraged to pursue a Computer Science degree at Catawba College.  In fact, the employment opportunities are very strong for graduates with a B.S. in Computer Science.  CareerCast noted that 4 out of the top 10 jobs of 2016 were related to the discipline of Computer Science.

Since a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science is not a degree typically offered by many small colleges, Catawba College students who choose it have unique opportunities for close interactions with faculty in the discipline and with their fellow students.  Our upper-level classes are capped at a small number to allow even more interaction between students and faculty. Additionally, incoming freshmen majoring in this degree program may be offered a Computer Science scholarship upon acceptance to the College.

The Catawba College faculty is committed to having Computer Science majors understand the interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary aspect of this program of study. The faculty also has a wide range of interests and backgrounds that allows students to study topics that they are interested in and not found in a typical course.  In the recent past, independent studies and seminars have been offered in areas related to computer science on topics such as partial differential equations and R-programming. 


Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science

Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science can expect a strong and solid foundation in Mathematics and Business, especially as it relates to Information Systems.


Computer Science Program Highlights

With a strong emphasis on mathematics, this major in Computer Science offers students an opportunity to gain preparation for managing systems and networks in a business.

Catawba Students Working at Computer
Internships in Computer Science.

Computer Science undergraduates are encouraged to participate in a variety of internships, most of which are completed during the summer months. Internships allow Catawba College students to bring their classroom learning to the real world and help them discover different potential career paths.

Catawba student working with Raspberry Pi technology in computer lab
Study Abroad and At Home in Computer Science.

Catawba College Computer Science majors are encouraged to think globally about how their skills can be put to work internationally and domestically.  Students can create their own independent study abroad opportunity or arrange one through Catawba’s consortium partner. Computer Science undergrads can also explore domestic experiential learning opportunities with large multinational companies.

Female Students coding at laptops (Photo: Girls Who Code)
Service Learning in Computer Science.

Sharing and passing along what they have learned are ways that Catawba College students pursuing a Computer Science degree are involved in Service Learning.  Recently, two Catawba faculty who teach courses in the Computer Science major, along with several of their undergraduates, helped the City of Salisbury launch a local chapter of Girls Who Code. These faculty and their students facilitated learning sessions for middle school girls to teach them about computers, websites, and how to write code.

Catawba Students in Computer Lab
Research Opportunities in Computer Science.

Research opportunities are provided for Computer Science majors in Senior Capstone courses.  A Capstone course is a special interest class where students get to choose a research project to explore in depth. The Capstone course is also a chance for students to think back over the entire major course work and see how all of the different pieces fit together in a project of their individual interests.

Related Bachelor Degree Programs

Outcomes.

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cOMPUTER sCIENCE DEGREE JOBS.

Computer Science and Mathematics majors ranked 5th out of the 10 College Majors with the Best Starting Salaries, according to USANews.com.

Catawba College Computer Science majors find jobs as:

  • Computer Programmers
  • Information Scientists
  • Systems Analysts
  • Data Scientists
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GRADUATE SCHOOLS.

If you are interested in pursuing graduate school after earning your undergraduate degree from Catawba College, you will be well-prepared.

Computer Science majors are pursuing graduate programs of study at these institutions:

  • UNC-Charlotte
  • N.C. State University

 

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"Catawba College has challenged me intellectually since day one, and I am grateful every chance I get to do something new. 

"Whether I’m writing 500 lines of code for numerical analysis, developing an app, or just programming in my spare time, Catawba College has opened a world of possibilities. The small school environment has also led to various conversations and opportunities outside of the class, like being inducted into Kappa Mu Epsilon and working as a tutor at the Math Center."

Chase Cummins ’19
Double major in Computer Science and Mathematics

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PARTICIPATE.

Computer Science undergrads can participate in the Math Club and Kappa Mu Epsilon, an honor society in Mathematics.  Additionally, Catawba students participate in Hack-A-Thons, particularly ones held in nearby Charlotte, N.C.

Faculty

Dr. Sharon Sullivan

Professor of Mathematics Dr. Sharon Sullivan considers herself a pure mathematician with research interests in algebraic combinatorics. She is very interested in taking various areas of mathematics and looking for patterns and special arrangements.

Dr. Doug Brown

Chair and Professor of Mathematics Dr. Doug Brown’s mathematical interests are in the foundations of the subject, an area that borders on philosophy and is frequently referred to as Mathematical Logic. In particular, his research is in the mysteriously named area of Reverse Mathematics; roughly the study of the axioms necessary to prove the fundamental theorems of Mathematics.

Dr. John Zerger

Professor of Mathematics Dr. John Zerger is a pure group theorist by training and spends a lot of time with interdisciplinary pursuits.  His students know he is also a master wood turner, regionally known for his hand-crafted pens.

Dr. Jason Hunt

Associate Professor of Mathematics Dr. Jason Hunt’s research interests are in areas of Discrete Math. In particular, he enjoys Graph Theory and Combinatorics. When not in the classroom, he enjoys working on his farm and raising and training Border Collies to herd sheep.

Dr. Katherine Baker

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science Dr. Katherine Baker was one of two faculty members who helped launch the Salisbury, N.C. Chapter of Girls Who Code.

Dr. Pamela Thompson

Associate Professor of Information Systems Dr. Pamela Thompson’s research interests are in application development and website design.  She also consults on systems networks and design.  She collaborated with Dr. Katherine Baker to help launch the Salisbury, N.C. Chapter of Girls Who Code.

Curriculum

Required Courses for B.S. in Computer Science
Required Courses for B.S. in Computer Science

MATH 1601 Principles of Mathematics

3

MATH 1801 Calculus

4

MATH 1802 Intermediate Calculus

4

MATH 2900 Introduction to Mathematical Proofs

3

MATH 3501 Linear Algebra

3

MATH 3521 Mathematical Statistics

3

CS 2602 Introduction to Structured Programming

3

CS 2505 Application Program Development

3

CS 2512 Hardware and Systems Software

3

MATH 3515 Numerical Analysis

3

CS 2550 Object-Oriented Design and Programming

3

CS 3510 Database Development

3

CS 3512 Networking and Telecommunications

3

CS 4400 Capstone Experience

3

TWO Electives from the following:               -  MATH 3531 Differential Equations (3) -  MATH 2801 Multivariable Calculus (3) -  CS 4101 Computer Science Seminar (1-3) -  CS 4401 Experiential Learning (1-6)

6

 

Total:

50

Course Descriptions
Course Descriptions

Computer Science Courses

2505 Application Program Development (3 hours)
A study of the design, programming, testing and implementation of information system applications using structured and objectoriented design principles. Programming logic is covered. Same as IS 2505.

2512 Hardware and Systems Software (3 hours)
A study of hardware/software technology, including tradeoffs in computer architecture for effective use in a business environment, installation and configuration of system architecture for single, central and networked computing systems, as well as single and multiuser operating systems. Same as IS 2512.

2550 Object-Oriented Design and Programming (3 hours)
A study of object-oriented application development, covering object-oriented analysis, design, and programming using a specific object-oriented language(s) for application development. Mobile application and web development topics are included. Prerequisite: IS 2505. Same as IS 2550.

2602 Introduction to Structured Programming (3 hours)
The initial programming course, to include control structures, stepwise refinements, top down analysis, data types, file structures, string manipulation, and arrays. Prerequisite: MATH 1801 or MATH 1701. Same as MATH 2602.

3510 Introduction to Databases (3 hours)
This course covers database design, development and the use of database management systems for applications. Data mining and data warehousing topics are introduced. Same as IS 3510.

3512 Computer Networking and Security (3 hours)
Fundamental principles of networking, including such topics as network analysis, design, implementation, security and management. Prerequisite: IS 2501 OR IS 2505 OR IS 3510 OR MATH 2602. Same as IS 3512.

4400 Capstone Experience (3 hours)
A capstone experience for advanced Computer Science majors to integrate content learned in courses spanning the major, including analysis, synthesis and evaluation of learned knowledge, in a project having a professional focus and effective communication of the results of the study. Course requirements also include a satisfactory score on a major field achievement test. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Computer Science Major. Same as MATH 4400.

4101 Computer Science Seminar (1-3 hours)
Reading, discussion, and projects on a topic in Computer Science selected by the department. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. Same as IS 4101.

4401 Experiential Learning (1-6 hours)
A reality-based, outside-of-the-classroom experience, under the supervision of a faculty member. This experience may include practicum, internship, service learning, study abroad, computer simulation, or other similar approved experience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Same as CA 4401 and MGT 4401.


Math Courses

1000 ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA (3 hours)
A study of fundamental concepts in basic mathematics, including fractions, factoring, graphing variables, inequalities, equations, real numbers, and functions, for students deficient in high school mathematics required for college admission. (Cannot be used for distribution requirement.) *Hours do not count towards 120 hours graduation requirement. (Offered only in Evening and Graduate Studies.)

1050 COLLEGE ALGEBRA (3 hours)
Arigorous and quick-paced study of the algebraic properties of the real numbers, including equations (linear and quadratic) and inequalities, functions (polynomials, rational, exponential, and logarithmic), and systems of equations.

1100 MODERN MATHEMATICS (3 hours)
An introduction to mathematical models including topics such as graph theory, scheduling problems, linear programming, coding theory, voting techniques, symmetry and patterns, consumer finance models, and logic.

1105 CULTURAL MATHEMATICS (3 hours)
A study of how mathematical ideas play a role in non-traditional societies, to include graph theory, logic and set theory, symmetry and patterns, group theory, and game theory applied to areas such as religion, social relations, art, calendar modeling, and story telling aspects.

1110 TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS (3 hours)
A study of selected topics from a cross-disciplinary perspective.

1120 SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS I (3 hours)
A broad study of number sense including set theory, logic, systems of numeration, number theory and the real number system, and basic algebra, graphs and functions. A student will not receive General Education credit in Math for both MATH 1120 and MATH 1100.

1121 SURVEY OF MATHEMATICS II (3 hours)
A broad study of patterns in math, including systems of equations, the metric system, intuitive geometry, modular arithmetic, probability and statistics,. This course is required of Elementary Education majors and Middle School Math majors.

1132 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS (3 hours)
An introduction to elementary statistics, including topics such as normal distribution, histograms, mean, standard deviations, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing techniques.

1516 PRE-CALCULUS (3 hours)
A rigorous and quick-paced study of the structure and algebraic properties of the real numbers, including equations (linear and quadratic) and inequalities, functions (polynomials, rational, exponential, and logarithmic), systems of equations, and trigonometric functions (including angles, measurements, and right triangle trigonometry). Cannot be taken if credit has already been received for MATH 1801. This course is intended (and prerequisite) for those students who plan on taking either MATH 1701 or MATH 1801.

1601 PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS (3 hours)
A study of the foundations of modern mathematics, including concepts which may be taken from the areas of graph theory, combinatorics and counting techniques, topology (including non-Euclidean geometry), mathematical modeling, linear algebra, modern algebra, and number theory.

1701 APPLIED CALCULUS (3 hours)
This course will illustrate methods for solving problems typically encountered in the social, natural, and life sciences and in business. Emphasis is on application rather than formal theory.

1801 CALCULUS (4 hours)
A study of the calculus of functions of a single variable. Topics may include techniques and application of differentiation, basic techniques of integration, applications of integration, elementary numerical integration, improper integrals, and l'Hopital's Rule.

1802 INTERMEDIATE CALCULUS (4 hours)
A continuation of the study of the calculus of functions of a single variable. Topics may include more advanced techniques of integration, infinate sequences and series, power series, (including Taylor and Maclaurin series), parametric equations and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: MATH 1801.

2535 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS (3 hours)
A historical integration of mathematical ideas, content, settings and biography, with particular attention to values of invention, creativity and application, as well as the influence of classical mathematics on recent developments. Prerequisite: MATH 1801 or MATH 1701.

2602 INTRODUCTION TO STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING (3 hours)
The initial programming course, to include control structures, stepwise refinements, top down analysis, data types, file structures, string manipulation, and arrays. Prerequisite: MATH 1801 or MATH 1701.

MATH 2801 MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS (3 hours)
A study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables and of vector-valued functions. Topics may include techniques and applications of differentiation, techniques and applications of iterated integrals, line integrals and surface integrals, Green’s Theorem, Stoke’s Theorem and the Divergence Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 1802.

2900 INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICAL PROOFS (3 hours)
An introduction to reading and writing mathematical proofs. Proof techniques and methods will be applied in areas that may include logic, sets, relations, functions, continuity, convergence, and countability arguments. Prerequisites: MATH 1801 or MATH 1701.

3501 LINEAR ALGEBRA (3 hours)
A study of the theory and applications of vector spaces, linear transformations, and matrices. Prerequisite: MATH 1801 or MATH 1701.

3515 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3 hours)
An introduction to numerical methods utilizing the computer, including the solution of a system of linear equations, solution of non-linear equations, numerical differentiation and integration. Prerequisites: MATH 2602.

3521 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS (3 hours)
A study of the theory and applications of probability and statistics, including discrete and continuous probability models and hypothesis testing.  Prerequisite: MATH 1802.

3531 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3 hours)
A study of the methods of solution of ordinary differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, nonhomogenous equations, inverse differential operators and transforms. Prerequisite: MATH 1802.

3533 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA (3 hours)
A study of basic algebraic structures, including groups, rings, and fields. Prerequisite: MATH 2900 and MATH 3501.

3535 COLLEGE GEOMETRY (3 hours)
A thorough study of Euclidean Geometry including Euclidean constructions and proof for polygons and circles involving congruence, area, loci, proportion and similarity. The study will also include Non-Euclidean Geometries. Prerequisite: MATH 2900 or permissions of instructor.

3541 ADVANCED CALCULUS (3 hours)
Rigorous treatment of real numbers, elements of set theory, sequences, limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration. Prerequisite: MATH 1802 and MATH 2900.

4101 MATHEMATICS SEMINAR ((1-3 hours))
Reading, discussion, independent research and written reports on a topic selected by the department. Prerequisite:Permission of Instructor.

4201 PRACTICUM IN MATHEMATICS (3 hours)
An application of theory and methods of specific areas of mathematics in a supervised field experience. Prerequisite: permission of Department Chairman.

4301 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MATHEMATICS (1-4 hours)
Self-directed study following a contractual plan initiated by the student and accepted by the staff. Prerequisite: permission of Department Chairman.

4400 CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE (3 hours)
A capstone experience for advanced mathematics majors to integrate content learned in courses spanning the major, including analysis, synthesis and evaluation of learned knowledge, in a project having a professional focus and effective communication of the results of the study. Course requirements also include a satisfactory score on a major field achievement test. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Math Major. Same as CS 4400.